“C.I.T.E.S.” Rules for parrot detention

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“C.I.T.E.S.” Rules for parrot detention

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“C.I.T.E.S.” Rules for parrot detention

In this article we are going to describe the documentation needed for a correct detention of our parrots.
The Convention on International Trade of Endangered wild fauna and flora Species is an agreement signed in 1973 and entered into force in 1975, still existing and applied by 178 countries. You can get information about the participating countries by visiting the CITES website.
CITES regulates and controls the international trade in wild species, guaranteeing their conservation.

"C.I.T.E.S." Rules for parrot detention

“C.I.T.E.S.” Rules for parrot detention

CITES classifies species in three Appendices:
– APPENDIX I
Includes all the species at risk of extinction for which trade is strictly forbidden.
– APPENDIX II
This appendix doesn’t necessarily include only endangered species but also species for which trade must be controlled in order to avoid excessive exploitation.
– APPENDIX III
Includes all the species protected by individual countries to regulate their export.
Only 4 parrot species are excluded from these lists and thus they don’t need any CITES documentation:
– Budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus)
– Rose-ringed parakeet (Psittacula krameri)
– Cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus)
– Peach faced lovebird (Agapornis roseicollis)
Every country has his own agreement actualization but they are quite similar.

Annexes
Protected species have been divided into four annexes:
– Annex A: includes some species from Appendices I and II. Species are listed in this annex according to different criteria such as the species rarity, commercial pressure and diffusion in wildlife. Examples of species that can be found in this annex are: the yellow-crowned parrot, the scarlet macaw, the military macaw and the African grey parrot.
– Annex B: mainly includes species from CITES Appendix II and some species from Appendix I for which a reserve has been requested due to the intense international exchange, which may not be compatible with the survival of these species. Some examples from annex B are the jandaya parakeet, the black headed parrot, the Alexandrine parakeet and lorikeets.
– Annex C: includes species from Appendix III for which a reserve request was made.
– Annex D: this last annex is very important because it controls the importation of species not requiring CITES documentation which have high volume in trade, and therefore control is necessary to preserve these species.
Compliance with this convention is carried out through controls on of certificates and permissions that must keep track of births, transfers and deaths of all these specimens.
In Italy, the responsible authority for the application of CITES regulation is the Ministero dell’ambiente e della tutela del territorio. The CITES management authority is the Corpo Forestale dello Stato (which recently became part of Carabinieri). The latter carries out checking and investigative activities and is in charge of releasing import and export certificates.

Control methods
When a specimen is transferred (e.g. sold), must be accompanied by a transfer certificate, according to law. Furthermore, every parrot born in a breeding have to prove that its birth took place in captivity with a microchip. This method is rarely used in Italy, but common in Spain, Netherlands and northern Europe. Immovable rings can be used for this purpose too.

"C.I.T.E.S." Rules for parrot detention

“C.I.T.E.S.” Rules for parrot detention

As for the rings, the 8th paragraph of art.66 reg. (CE) 338/97 says: …”the marking must be made by placing a ring bearing an individual marking around the paw. Ringing must be made with a ring constituting a continuous circle without joints or breaks which have not undergone any kind of tampering, industrially manufactured for this purpose and applied in the early life days of the animal; its diameter must prevent removal from the bird’s paw when it is fully developed”.
We can therefore summarize that open, broken, welded, glued and expanded rings along with those home-made are not suitable.
Rings must be applied to the animal’s paw in the first days of life, correct timing may vary from 10 to 15 days depending from parrot species. Each ring to be complete must include the following marks:
– The national breeders register number, composed of 4 letters/numbers indicates in which breeding the parrot was born. Every association has its own register and the number refers to it.
– Birth year, in some cases ring color may vary according to the specific year.
– Ring dimension, as in millimeters of diameter.
– The sequential number from the internal breeding’s enumeration.
Ring materials are either aluminum, for small beak species, or steel, to avoid species with bigger beak to break it. In order to participate in ornithological exhibitions or sporting events, parrots need a ring recognized from the association that called the exhibition.

Birth declaration
This document, mandatory since 1992, is required for animals belonging to CITES appendices I and II to ensure that the specimens are born in captivity. This document to be valid must report:
– the declarant’s data
– the number of newborns
– both scientific and common name of the species
– the mark reference (ring or microchip)
The complete document must be sent to the local CITES service within 10 days.

Transfer document
This document is needed when the animal owner changes. It must be completed in double copy (for the transferor and for the recipient) and must contain:
– the transferor and receiver data
– the birth declaration’s protocol number
– indication of which CITES office received the original birth declaration
– the mark reference (ring or microchip)transferor and recipient sings

"C.I.T.E.S." Rules for parrot detention

“C.I.T.E.S.” Rules for parrot detention

Detention register
The detention register is mandatory only for breeders selling their animals.
The register is available for free asking at the CITES office in your area. A log for each annex is required (A and B). A register is divided in two sections, “load” and “unload”. In the “load” section the breeder must list all the specimen in possession, in the “unload” the giveaways or deaths. Only for the species listed in annex A, birth and death declarations to the local CITES office are also mandatory, along with the registration. All the registrations for the respective requiring species must be done within 10 days from the event. Irregularities can involve very expensive administrative sanctions.

DISCLAIMER: all the information contained in this article may vary according to your country’s specific laws. Pay also attention to the continuous changes due to CITES decisions.
Here is a table with species from Annexes A, B and C.
The table we provide itself is constantly updated due to the integration or retrocession of species. For example, the African grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus) has been recently moved from annex B to annex A.
Parrots for Friends recommends to ask competent authorities for updated information when purchasing a CITES protected parrot, not to incur into penalties due to incorrect detention.

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